Harnessing Quantum Drum Technology for the Future of Quantum Computing

Category Physics

tldr
18 seconds

Scientists have developed a new way to store and transmit quantum data using a quantum drum, a small membrane that can convert light signals into sonic vibrations. This technology has the potential to greatly advance the capabilities of quantum computers and create a quantum internet with lightning-fast speeds and unparalleled security.

content
3 minutes, 23 seconds

Just beneath Niels Bohr's old office is a basement where scattered tables are covered with small mirrors, lasers, and an agglomeration of all types of devices connected by webs of wires and heaps of tape. It looks like a child's project gone too far, one that their parents have tried in vain to get them to clean up.

While it is difficult for the untrained eye to discern that these tables are actually the home to an array of world-leading research projects, the important stuff is happening within worlds so small that not even Newton's laws apply. This is where Niels Bohr's quantum physical heirs are developing the most cutting-edge of quantum technologies.

The quantum drum was first discovered in 2010 by researchers at the University of Copenhagen.

One of these projects stands out – for physicists at least – by the fact that a gizmo visible to the naked eye is able to achieve quantum states. The quantum drum is a small membrane made of a ceramic, glass-like material with holes scattered in a neat pattern along its edges.

When the drum is beaten with the light of a laser, it begins vibrating, and does so, so quickly and undisturbed, that quantum mechanics come into play. This property has long since caused a stir by opening up a number of quantum technological possibilities.

The drum is so delicate that even the slightest disturbance can cause it to lose its quantum state.

Now, a collaboration across various quantum areas at the Institute has demonstrated that the drum can also play a key role for the future's network of quantum computers. Like modern alchemists, researchers have created a new form of "quantum memory" by converting light signals into sonic vibrations.

In a just-published research article, the researchers have proven that quantum data from a quantum computer emitted as light signals – e.g., through the type of fiber-optic cable already used for high-speed internet connections – can be stored as vibrations in the drum and then forwarded.

The drum has the potential to greatly increase the speed and security of quantum communication.

Previous experiments demonstrated to researchers that the membrane can remain in an otherwise fragile quantum state. And on this basis, they believe that the drum should be able to receive and transmit quantum data without it "decohering", i.e., losing its quantum state when the quantum computers are ready.

"This opens up great perspectives for the day when quantum computers can really do what we expect them to. Quantum memory is likely to be fundamental for sending quantum information over distances. So, what we've developed is a crucial piece in the very foundation for an internet of the future with quantum speed and quantum security," says postdoc Mads Bjerregaard Kristensen of the Niels Bohr Institute, lead author of the new research article.

The team behind this new research includes scientists from several different quantum research fields.

When transferring information between two quantum computers over a distance – or among many in a quantum internet – the signal will quickly be drowned out by noise. The amount of noise in a fiber-optic cable increases exponentially the longer the cable is. Eventually, data can no longer be decoded.

The classical Internet and other major computer networks solve this noise problem by amplifying signals in small stations along transmission routes. But for quantum computers to apply an analogous method, their fragile quantum data must first be protected. That's where the quantum drum comes in. By converting quantum data into sonic vibrations, it can prevent loss and distortion of the data, allowing it to be transmitted accurately over longer distances.

The technology used in this research has been successfully used to create the world's first quantum network.

The potential impact of this technology is immense. With the ability to store and transmit quantum data, the quantum drum could play a crucial role in creating a quantum internet and significantly advancing the capabilities of quantum computers. With the help of this small but powerful drum, we may be on our way to a future of quantum speed and quantum security.



Unprecedented Discoveries: Radio Signals from a Dormant Star

Category Physics

tldr
33 seconds

In 2024, researchers used CSIRO's Murriyang telescope to make an unprecedented discovery: unusual radio pulses coming from magnetar XTE J1810-197, the closest known magnetar to Earth at 8,000 light years away. This magnetar emits circularly polarized light, suggesting complex interactions at its surface, and a superheated plasma acting as a polarizing filter. The discovery was made possible by CSIRO's cutting-edge receiver, and studying magnetars can provide insights into extreme and unusual phenomena in the Universe.

hashtags

The Rise of Neutral-Atom Quantum Computing: A New Challenger in the Race to Full-Scale Quantum Computing

Category Physics

tldr
27 seconds

Neutral-atom quantum computing is gaining traction as a potential solution to the challenge of scaling up quantum computers. Recent advances have overcome previous limitations, making it a promising contender for commercialization. Neutral-atom qubits use the phenomena of superposition and entanglement for computation. Harvard researchers have successfully performed quantum computations using programmable quantum circuits with hundreds of neutral-atom qubits.

hashtags

Revolutionizing Material Research: A New Method for Generating Elliptically Polarized Light

Category Physics

tldr
19 seconds

A new study by JILA introduces a simple method for generating elliptically polarized light, which is essential for advanced material research. This method could pave the way for improved electronic devices and has implications for the study of chiral and magnetic materials, leading to potential advancements in fields such as computing and data storage.

hashtags

The Early Builders: Shakti and Shiva Galaxies Together Formed the Milky Way

Category Physics

tldr

Astronomers have identified two of the earliest building blocks of the Milky Way, Shakti and Shiva galaxies, that merged with our galaxy over 12 billion years ago. Using data from the Gaia satellite and the SDSS survey, these proto-galactic fragments were found to have similar energy and angular momentum values, providing insight into the galaxy's early formation. The results have been published in the Astrophysical Journal.

hashtags

The Unexpected Connection Between Quantum Computing and Aperiodic Tilings

Category Physics

tldr

Aperiodic tilings, a type of tiling set with endlessly unique patterns, have been studied by mathematicians since the 1960s. Recently, two physicists discovered a connection between aperiodic tilings and quantum error-correcting codes, a critical component of future quantum computers. This unexpected link highlights the potential for cross-disciplinary inspiration and innovation in both fields.

hashtags

Splitting Continents and Shaping Earthquakes: New Findings on the Formation of the Seattle Fault Zone

Category Physics

tldr

A recent study offers new insights on the formation of the Seattle fault zone, a series of shallow faults that pose a risk of destructive earthquakes to the four million people living in the Puget Sound region. The study suggests that the fault may have originated from the continent's edge splitting in half over 50 million years ago, caused by a chain of volcanic islands pulling towards the continent. Understanding the Seattle fault's behavior and hazards is crucial for protecting the region, as well as other potentially hazardous geological features in the Pacific Northwest.

hashtags

ESA approves mission to detect gravitational waves with trio of spacecraft

Category Physics

tldr

ESA has approved the LISA mission which will launch in 2035 and use a trio of spacecraft to detect gravitational waves from space. LISA is a collaboration between ESA, NASA, and international scientists and will offer new insights into cosmic events and the universe's expansion. The mission will also provide important information on the growth of massive black holes and the evolution of galaxies, as well as aid in measuring the expansion of the universe.

hashtags

Global Room-Temperature Superconductivity in Graphite: Theory and Experimental Evidence

Category Physics

tldr

Researchers have reported evidence for global zero-resistance state, RTSC, in scotch-tape cleaved graphite containing surface line defects. This supports the theory that global superconductivity in graphite arises from the presence of these defects and is influenced by the underlying Bernal graphite structure. Graphite continues to be a promising material in the search for room temperature superconductors.

hashtags

First Experimental Evidence of Vacuum Decay Observed in Italian Experiment

Category Physics

tldr

An Italian experiment, supported by Newcastle University, has provided the first experimental evidence of vacuum decay. This occurs through the creation of small bubbles and is supported by both theoretical simulations and numerical models. The experiment used a supercooled gas and could pave the way for further understanding of the early universe and ferromagnetic quantum phase transitions. The ultimate goal is to observe vacuum decay at absolute zero, which is being pursued in a national collaboration at Cambridge.

hashtags

Confirming the Elusive Sterile Neutrino: The Baksan Experiment on Sterile Transitions (BEST)

Category Physics

tldr

The Baksan Experiment on Sterile Transitions (BEST) has found evidence of the sterile neutrino, a hypothetical particle that only interacts through gravity. This confirms an anomaly found in previous experiments and raises questions about our understanding of neutrinos and potential new physics.

hashtags

Shedding Light on the Formation of Magnetic Fields

Category Physics

tldr

New theoretical research suggests that dark matter mini-halos scattered throughout the cosmos can act as probes of primordial magnetic fields. If magnetic fields are indeed primordial then it could cause an increase in dark matter density perturbations, forming mini-halos of dark matter. The growth in baryon density gravitationally induces the growth of dark matter perturbations without the possibility of subsequent cancellation, thus being a possible indication of primordial magnetic fields.

hashtags

Non-Reciprocal Interactions Between Single Molecules Without External Forces Discovered

Category Physics

tldr

Scientists have discovered a new mechanism by which single molecules can interact in a non-reciprocal manner without the use of external forces. Researchers from the University of Maine and Penn State explained this process is facilitated by the kinetic asymmetry of chemical catalysts, and may have played a role in the development of complex matter from simple matter.

hashtags

Exploring the Orbital Hall Effect: A Potential Step Forward for Future Spintronics Applications

Category Physics

tldr

In a new breakthrough, researchers have used a novel technique to confirm a previously undetected physics phenomenon that could be used to improve data storage in the next generation of computer devices - the Orbital Hall effect. Led by Igor Lyaling, a graduate student in physics from The Ohio State University, the team was able to detect a clear magneto-optical signal by reflecting light off of thin films of the light metal chromium. This breakthrough could result in lower power consumption, higher speeds, and higher reliability in applications, as well as help to extend the technology's lifespan.

hashtags

Christmas Tree Galaxy Cluster: PEARLS of JWST

Category Physics

tldr

Astronomers used NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to discover 14 transient objects in the Christmas Tree Galaxy Cluster, MACS0416, about 4.3 billion light-years away. Transients, which briefly brighten and then fade, reveal information about distant stars and the universe's structure. An international team of scientists, led by University of Missouri's Haojing Yan, used JWST to research the galaxy cluster and confirmed what's causing the transients previously seen using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Two of the transients are supernovae, which can be used to study their host galaxies, and the team has used the data to learn more about the structure of the magnifying glass and dark matter distribution.

hashtags

The Christmas Tree Galaxy Cluster Reveals a Vivid Landscape of Galaxies

Category Physics

tldr

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope have combined to create one of the most detailed and colorful portraits of the cosmos, dubbed the Christmas Tree Galaxy Cluster. This galaxy cluster about 4.3 billion light-years from Earth magnifies the light of distant background galaxies through a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing. An international collaboration, the Prime Extragalactic Areas for Reionization and Lensing Science (PEARLS), is credited with acquiring the data resulting in the discoveries. The telescope has already found stars in far away galaxies that are magnified by the gravitational field of nearby foreground galaxies.

hashtags

Antimatter: Its Origin, Properties, and Mysterious Asymmetry

Category Physics

tldr

Antimatter is the opposite of normal matter in every way. Matter and antimatter destroy each other upon contact, so a mystery exists of why there is any matter left in the universe considering it should have all annihilated upon the Big Bang. The Department of Energy Office of Science has numerous research projects around understanding the asymmetry between matter and antimatter.

hashtags

Understanding Superfluid 3He and its Implications

Category Physics

tldr

Researchers from Lancaster University have discovered how superfluid 3He would physically feel if put a finger into it, redefining our understanding of this unique element's structure and implications for quantum physics.

hashtags

Quantum Observables Cannot be Separated from their Interactions With Respected Environment: An Analysis

Category Physics

tldr

Hiroshima University physicists recently published a study in Physical Review Research which suggest that the physical reality of an object and multiple possible realities cannot be reconciled with the same physical reality. The study demonstrated how quantum superpositions in the dynamics of a measurement interaction shape the observable reality of a system.

hashtags

Pagination: page = 0, postsCount = 2101, postsPerPage = 19, totalPages = 111